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5: Two Dimensional Kinematics

  • Page ID
    24451
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    Where was the chap I saw in the picture somewhere? Ah yes, in the dead sea floating on his back, reading a book with a parasol open. Couldn’t sink if you tried: so thick with salt. Because the weight of the water, no, the weight of the body in the water is equal to the weight of the what? Or is it the volume equal to the weight? It’s a law something like that. Vance in High school cracking his finger joints, teaching. The college curriculum. Cracking curriculum. What is weight really when you say weight? Thirty two feet per second per second. Law of falling bodies: per second per second. They all fall to the ground. The earth. It’s the force of gravity of the earth is the weight [1] - James Joyce

    [1] James Joyce, Ulysses, The Corrected Text edited by Hans Walter Gabler with Wolfhard Steppe and Claus Melchior, Random House, New York.


    This page titled 5: Two Dimensional Kinematics is shared under a CC BY-NC-SA 4.0 license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by Peter Dourmashkin (MIT OpenCourseWare) via source content that was edited to the style and standards of the LibreTexts platform; a detailed edit history is available upon request.