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17.2: Introduction

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    29211
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    Sometimes, if a person is very careful, a glass can be overfilled such that a bubble of water rises above the lip of the glass.  The bubble of water is an example of surface tension.  Water has molecular characteristics which allow the molecules to be strongly attracted to each other, and the molecular attractions are strongest at the surface.  The water molecules and the glass molecules are also attracted to each other.

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    17.2: Introduction is shared under a CC BY license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by LibreTexts.

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