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41.4: Procedures

  • Page ID
    29357
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    You will use dozens of items to visualize moles of particles (atoms/molecules).

    Dozens

    1. Draw two tables in which to record your data for dozens, grams, and pieces.  Do not fill in data until you have read the instructions for obtaining that data.

    Table \(\PageIndex{1}\): Dozens

    Item

    Measured Mass per Dozen

    Calculated Dozens in 15 Grams

    Calculated Mass of 3 Dozen

    Measured Mass of 3 Dozen

    Small Paperclips

           

    Large Paperclips

           

    Small Metal Nuts

           

    Large Metal Nuts

           
    Table \(\PageIndex{2}\): Pieces

    Item

    Calculated Dozens per 36 Pieces

    Calculated Mass of 1 Piece

    Measured Mass of 1 Piece

    Small Paperclips

         

    Large Paperclips

         

    Small Metal Nuts

         

    Large Metal Nuts

         
    1. Measure and record in your dozens data table, the mass in grams of one dozen small paperclips, one dozen large paperclips, one dozen small metal nuts, and one dozen large metal nuts.  

    2. Calculate how many dozens a 15 gram sample would contain, for each type of item.  Record these values in your dozens data table.

    3. Calculate and record in your dozens data table, the mass of 3 dozen for each type of item.  Then use the triple beam balance to measure the mass of 3 dozen, for each type of item.

    4. Calculate and record in your pieces data table, the number of dozens in a 36 piece sample, for each type of item.

    5. Calculate and record in your pieces data table, the average mass in grams of one piece, for each type of item.  Then use the triple beam balance to measure the mass of one piece, for each type of item.

    Moles

    1. Draw two tables in which to record your data for moles, grams, and particles.  Read the instructions for determining the values to enter in these tables.  You will be following similar processes as you followed for the metal items, for each column in the data tables.

    Table \(\PageIndex{3}\): Moles

    Element

    Measured Mass per Mole

    Calculated Moles in 15 Grams

    Calculated Mass of 3 Moles

    Aluminum

         

    Iron

         

    Helium

         

    Carbon

         
    Table \(\PageIndex{4}\): Particles

    Element

    Calculated Moles per \(1.8 \times 10^{24}\) Atoms

    Calculated Mass of 1 Atom

    Aluminum

       

    Iron

       

    Helium

       

    Carbon

       
    1. Use the periodic table to determine the measured mass in grams of one mole of atoms, for each type of atom listed in the table.  Record these values in your moles data table.

    2. Calculate how many moles a 15 gram sample would contain, for each type of atom.  Record these values in your moles data table.

    3. Calculate and record in your moles data table, the mass of 3 moles for each type of atom listed.

    4. Calculate and record in your particles data table, the number of moles in a sample that contains \(1.806 \times 10^{24}\) particles, for each type of atom.

    5. Calculate and record in your particles data table, the average mass in grams of one particle, for each type of atom.

    Clean-up

    • Check that none of your paperclips or metal nuts were mixed

    Contributors and Attributions


    41.4: Procedures is shared under a CC BY license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by LibreTexts.

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