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4: DC Currents

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    56988
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    The goal of this chapter is to discuss the distribution of stationary (“dc”) currents inside conducting media. In the most important case of linear (“Ohmic”) conductivity, the partial differential equations governing the distribution are reduced to the same Laplace and Poisson equations whose solution methods were discussed in detail in Chapter 2 – though sometimes with different boundary conditions. Because of that, the chapter is rather brief.

    Thumbnail: Basic Wheatstone bridge. (CC BY-SA 4.0 International; Daraceleste via Wikipedia)


    This page titled 4: DC Currents is shared under a CC BY-NC-SA 4.0 license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by Konstantin K. Likharev via source content that was edited to the style and standards of the LibreTexts platform; a detailed edit history is available upon request.